Social Justice Days

Social Justice Days

Social Justice days 2013!
Join us from February 9th – February 15th,2013
Intended to stimulate an alternative political culture in the McGill University community and beyond, Social Justice Days is about to mark its seventh year with a week of workshops, discussions, film screenings, and speakers engaging local and global issues. This is the 7th year of Social Justice Days on McGill campus, and we are very excited to have such a wide range of events organized by community and campus groups! We are going to be presenting on topics ranging from Black History in Montreal to Sex Workers Self-determination, and connecting global (such as anti-colonialism struggles in the Philippines) to local (migrant justice organizing in Montreal) struggles.

Social Justice Days is an annual event series co-organized by the Quebec Public Interest Research Group (QPIRG) at McGill and the Students’ Society of McGill University (SSMU).

All venues on campus are wheelchair accessible (unless noted otherwise).

All events are free of charge except for the fundraiser.

For childcare or translation, please reserve 48 hours in advance at 514-398-7432 or qpirg@ssmu.mcgill.ca.

Schedule:

Saturday, February 9th 10:30pm – Il Motore

Panda-monium! Tiger-monium! Wolf-mania! A dance party fundraiser for strange and queer animals

Monday February 11th 6:30pm – 3480 McTavish – Lev Bukhman room.

Panel: From L’Opération McGill français to McGill bilingue : A people’s history of language and class struggles for accessible education at McGill University from 1969 to 2013

Tuesday February 12th 6pm – TBA

PANEL: Where the f*k am I?! : Black student organizing at McGill

Wednesday February 13th 1pm-3pm – 3480 McTavish – Rm. 202 (Madeline Parent Room)

Workshop: Righting the Wrongs – Sex Workers Organize for Self-Determination

Wednesday February 13th 5pm – 3480 McTavish – Rm. 202 (Madeline Parent Room)

Workshop:Struggles Against Capitalist Colonialism: How Indigenous Feminisms Will Save the Earth and Destroy the State

Thursday, February 14th – 2pm-4pm – 3480 McTavish – Rm. 202 (Madeline Parent Room)

Workshop: The Permanence of Temporary Work

Thursday, February 14th – 6pm – Metro St-Laurent.

Memorial March for Missing and Murdered Women

Thursday, February 14th 2013 – 8pm – Katacombes (1635 St-Laurent, Metro St-Laurent).

Rock Against Racism MTL #2 – Une soirée bénéfice pour Families of Sisters in Spirit and the campaign for justice for missing and murdered Aboriginal women.

Friday, February 15th, 1:30pm – 3480 McTavish (room B-29)

Film Screening by Midnight Kitchen: Darwin’s Nightmare

Friday, February 15th 5pm – 3480 McTavish – TBA

Workshop: Counter Occupy! A not what you think movement

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FULL SCHEDULE: FEBRUARY 9th – 15th 2013

Saturday, February 9th 10:30pm – Il Motore

Panda-monium! Tiger-monium! Wolf-mania! A dance party fundraiser for strange and queer animals

The city is encased in ice, freezing everything in place, until pandæmonium is unleashed.

Everything melts, everyone moves, bodies explode into different shapes, animals become people and people become animals.

The dance floor swarms like bees in the springtime.

Panda-monium! Tiger-monium! Wolf-mania!
A dance party for strange and queer animals

with DJs:

TAMIKA
Pasha
REZurrection

and opening with STUDFINDER!

++++And booths filled with earthly delights++++

**photo booth*
**bake sale booth**
*kissing booth**

It will be the best time ever

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5$-10$/pwyc (nobody turned away for lack of funds)

|a benefit for IWC and Solidarity Across Borders |

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Monday February 11th 6:30pm – 3480 McTavish – Lev Bukhman room.

Panel: From L’Opération McGill français to McGill bilingue : A people’s history of language and class struggles for accessible education at McGill University from 1969 to 2013


Within the current and historical context of language policy debates on campus and reflecting on issues raised during the 2012 student strike mobilization, this panel will offer perspectives on the struggle for accessible education at McGill University for Francophone and working class students. The goal of this panel is to provide historical perspectives on contemporary debates concerning bilingualism and accessible education at McGill. The panelists will address the roots of these struggles on campus from March 28, 1969, when 10,000 young people demonstrated as part of L’Opération McGill and in relation to transnational movements against colonialism and imperialism, to last year’s historic strike mobilization against the tuition hikes that also raised issues of class and capitalism and saw historic turnouts on Anglophone campuses in Montreal, requiring new strategies taken-up within the broader and, historically, more Francophone student movement.

Roundtable discussion with invited guests:

Hosted by Marieve Isabel (former PGGS VP-External, 2011-2012).

Presented by:

The Graduate Student Mobilization Convergence (GSMC) formed in the winter of 2012 under the name The Graduate Student Mobilization Group with the purpose of organizing against Quebec’s proposed tuition hikes. As members of the McGill community and the Quebec student movement, the GSMC prioritizes an anti-oppressive framework in our organizing that addresses local histories and ongoing experiences of colonialism, racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression. The GSMC is committed to cultivating autonomous student resistance to the tuition hikes and repression on campus and in our communities.

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Tuesday February 12th 6pm – TBA

PANEL: Where the f*k am I?! : Black student organizing at McGill


For this panel presentation, Black McGill students and alumni will share past and ongoing experiences of navigating the McGill institution. The goal of the panel will be to raise awareness of and promote critical thinking about these experiences and related issues.

Examples of issues that panelists might address include:

Presented by:

C-UniT is a QPIRG working group coordinated by Black students at McGill University, in collaboration with members of Montreal’s Black Community. Started in 2011 as a response to what we experienced as a “lack of Blackness”—Black professors, Black scholarship, Black cultural sensibilities—in our university experiences, C-UniT works to counter the cultural alienation often experienced by Black students at McGill and to build ties between the university and local Black community members, groups and organizations. C-UniT is an anti-oppressive, inclusive collective and welcomes the support and participation in our activities of allies from all communities and backgrounds.

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Wednesday February 13th 1pm-3pm – 3480 McTavish – Rm. 202 (Madeline Parent Room)

Workshop: Righting the Wrongs – Sex Workers Organize for Self-Determination


The workshop gives an overview of realities vs. myths of the sex trade in Montreal and the wide variety of people who work in it. We’ll talk about the realities of stigmatization and media depictions of sex work, and also about sex-worker led tactics of fighting against violence. We’ll also discuss why sex workers in Canada and around the world are demanding decriminalization, and the harmful effects of the laws criminalizing sex work on our health and safety. Fundamentally, this workshop should provide a helpful 101 on why sex workers’ rights are a social justice issue. There will be plenty of time for (respectful) discussion after the presentation.

Presented by Robyn, a full-time outreach worker at Stella, a by-and-for sex workers’ organization working with sex workers around health and safety in Montreal.

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Wednesday February 13th 5pm – 3480 McTavish – Rm. 202 (Madeline Parent Room)

Workshop:Struggles Against Capitalist Colonialism: How Indigenous Feminisms Will Save the Earth and Destroy the State


An introduction to some of the thoughts and work of indigenous feminisms and feminists on occupied Turtle Island (“North America”), and how the anti-colonialist struggles of indigenous women, queers, and two-spirited people are fundamentally and radically anarchic and anti-capitalist in their construction and organization. Colonialism, misogyny, and capitalism are deeply interconnected, and activists cannot engage in feminist or anti-capitalist struggle without also working to decolonize ourselves, our relations with one another, and the spaces & land we inhabit. These ideas and thoughts will be connected to the current happenings in Quebec, with discussion on how to create a truly revolutionary social movement.

Presented by

Molly is a Métis anarcha-feminist hailing from the seam that separates mountain from prairie in the deep West of colonized Assiniboia. She’s out East to cause trouble and do a Joint Honours Women’s Studies and Religious Studies degree at McGill.

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Thursday, February 14th – 2pm-4pm – 3480 McTavish – Rm. 202 (Madeline Parent Room)

Workshop: The Permanence of Temporary Work


It is becoming increasingly known that much of Canada’s labour needs are being met by recruited foreign workers. The story of Tunisian welders in Chicoutimi is one example of the precarious, and often unreliable, circumstances of foreign workers. While the opportunity to live and work in Canada through the Temporary Foreign Worker Program may appear attainable, the reality for workers is a series of barriers to permanence and stability.

This workshop will present a short clip from the film “The End of Immigration”, followed by a presentation via skype with a temporary foreign worker outside of Montreal. Finally, a member from the Immigrant Workers Centre will discuss some of the current projects geared toward justice for temporary foreign workers.

Presented by The Immigrant Workers Centre.

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Thursday, February 14th – 6pm – Metro St-Laurent.

Memorial March for Missing and Murdered Women


The first women’s memorial march was held in 1991 in response to the murder of a Coast Salish woman on Powell Street in Vancouver. Her name is not spoken today out of respect for the wishes of her family. Out of this sense of hopelessness and anger came an annual march on Valentine’s Day to express compassion, community, and caring for all women in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Unceded Coast Salish Territories.

Twenty-two years later, the women’s memorial march continues to honour the lives of missing and murdered women.

This year, Montreal holds it’s 4th Annual Memorial March.

*There will be a bus this year from Kahnawake, and back, organized by Kahnawake Shakotiia’takehnhas Community Services. The bus will leave the KSCS Parking lot at 4:30 pm and return at approx 9 pm. Start (drop off) at St Laurent metro and pick up (to return home) at Parc des Ameriques- St Laurent and Rachel street.*

With guests:

and more….!

There will be hot chocolate served!

For more information:

Missing Justice

justiceformissing@gmail.com

514-937-2110

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Thursday, February 14th 2013 – 8pm – Katacombes (1635 St-Laurent, Metro St-Laurent).

Rock Against Racism MTL #2 – Une soirée bénéfice pour Families of Sisters in Spirit and the campaign for justice for missing and murdered Aboriginal women.


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20h-3h
$6-10, sliding scale
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Portes//Doors 20h

Bands 21h

Projections par Anitabreakwww.fortheloveoflightandshadow.org

23h30 – 3h
DJ dance party dance dance dance fun W/ DJ Radikale + DJ Cuntroversy

**Info on Families of Sisters in Spirit: www.facebook.com/pages/Families-of-Sisters-in-Spirit/

** Before the show, we encourage you to go to the Memorial March for Missing and Murdered Aboriginal women, 6pm, metro St-Laurent https://www.facebook.com/events/133782500116491/

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Friday, February 15th, 1:30pm – 3480 McTavish (room B-29)

Film Screening by Midnight Kitchen: Darwin’s Nightmare

Come get some vegan lunch and watch Darwin’s Nightmare with the Midnight Kitchen! We’ll start serving at 12:30pm in room B-30 (remember to bring your own tupperware, or borrow a plate from MK on the 3rd floor) — grab your food and head next door to watch this documentary while you eat.

Description of Darwin’s Nightmare: A unique break from the traditional colonialist perspective of climate change and resource accessibility, Darwin’s Nightmare uses the example of the Nile Perch fish of Lake Victoria in Tanzania to examine the political economy of the region and expose excruciating effects of global capitalism. This film can be viewed as a case study in the dynamics of neo-liberalism and neo-colonialism, particularly the oppression of the global south by way of natural resources.

Presented by Midnight Kitchen: a non-profit, volunteer and worker run food collective dedicated to providing affordable, healthy food to as many people as possible. Based out of McGill University, we provide free/by donation vegan lunches 5 days a week, Monday through Friday, at 12:30 in the SSMU building on McGill campus. For more information, or to get in touch about volunteering with MK, visit: http://themidnightkitchen.wordpress.com

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Friday, February 15th 5pm – 3480 McTavish – TBA

Workshop: Counter Occupy! A not what you think movement

While western-based mass movements, albeit inspired by the “Arab Spring”, focus their discussions around occupying as a tactic to take back public spaces (whether symbolically or literally) from private hands, the mass movements and revolutionary movements of the south take on a counter-occupation strategy; one of national and social liberation movements.

The objective of the workshop/film screening is to discuss the politics behind US occupation particularly in the context of the Philippines. The Philippine-American War of 1899 and the ensuing US occupation and then neo-colonization of the Philippines has lasting effects. It is a reality faced by the millions of Filipino migrants and their children today. Members of Anakbayan and their project/working group Lakas Paggawa seek to address these lasting effects of occupation/colonization on the young immigrant workers exploited and discriminated in their workplace.

The discussions will touch upon the unequal and oppressive relations of US as well Canada on the one hand and the people of the Philippines on the other. The effects of these uneven relations are seen through the forced migration of Filipinos leaving the country each day and their continued oppression within countries like Canada that they face.

Co-Organized by: